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ABOUT US

Oshiya (“Railway Station japanese pusher”) is a new spanish urban clothing brand that was born from the fusion of elements of the sneaker culture with art and fashion. We strive for a clean manufacturing process that respects the environment both now and in the long term and avoids unnecessary pollution. Above all, we are committed to the well being of our workers and our products are all Fair Trade, as is shown on our certified labels.

While we are dedicated to keeping our products consistent with our values and ideals, we are equally dedicated to creating totally original products of the highest quality which offer a unique alternative.

All of our products and their components, including packaging, labels and bags, are purchased or produced in Spain. This gives our products an extra added value as well as being an important part of our identity as a brand.

FWF-small-logoMillions of garment workers around the world face poor working conditions and_limits to their rigths and freedoms. Wages
are too low to survive on, work days are extremely long and conditions are unsafe. Workers are rarely free to join unions and_improve their own situation.
Fair Wear Foundation member brands work towards improving conditions by implementing the eight standards at the heart of the Code of Labour Practices.
1) EMPLOYMENT IS FREELY CHOSEN
Workers cannot be forced to work, for example by withholding their salaries or by locking them up.
2) NO DISCRIMINATION IN EMPLOYMENT
Most workers are women. They often face descrimination and harassment. We work towards better conditions for women and other vulnerable groups like migrant workers.
3) NO EXPLOITATION OF CHILD LABOUR
Children should be able to go to school. Once they’re old enough to work, they should be protected from hazardous work or long hours.
4) FREEDOM OF ASSOCIATION AND THE RIGHT TO COLLECTIVE BARGAINING
For sustainable change, it’s crucial that workers have a voice in the improvement of their working conditions. The right to form unions and bargain with factories is the first step.
5) PAYMENT OF A LIVING WAGE
Working for a living – that’s the idea. Wages for a normal working week should be enough to meet basic needs of workers and their families and to provide some discretionary income.
6) REASONABLE WORKING HOURS
Working six days a week, eight hours a day. That’s what the UN says is the maximum. Any more than that should be voluntary, paid and not more than twelve hours a week.
7) SAFE AND HEALTHY WORKING CONDITIONS
Workers have a right to safe and healthy working conditions. That means accessible fi re exits and proper safety gear. And if they need to work with hazardous materials or equipment, they need to know how.
8) A LEGALLY BINDING EMPLOYMENT RELATIONSHIP
Workers have legal rights to a contract and certain benefi ts, like pension payments, social security, insurances and severence pay. Employers need to respect those rights.

Oekotex_LogoThe OEKO-TEX® Standard 100 is an independent testing and certification system for textile raw materials, intermediate and end products at all stages of production. Examples for items eligible for certification: Raw and dyed/finished yarns, raw and dyed/finished fabrics and knits, ready-made articles (all types of clothing, domestic and household textiles, bed linen, terry cloth items, textile toys and more).

Testing for harmful substances includes:
• illegal substances
• legally regulated substances
• known harmful (but not legally regulated) chemicals
• as well as parameters for health care
The requirement for certification of textile products according to OEKO-TEX® Standard 100 is that all components of an item have to comply with the required criteria without exception – that means in addition to the outer material also sewing threads, linings, prints etc. as well as non-textile accessories such as buttons, zip fasteners, rivets etc.

gots_logo The Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS) is the world’s leading textile processing standard for organic fibres, including ecological and social criteria, backed by independent certification of the entire textile supply chain.
The aim of the standard is to define globally recognised requirements that ensure the organic status of textiles, from harvesting of the raw materials through environmentally and socially responsible manufacturing all the way to labelling in order to provide credible assurance to the end consumer.
Organic cotton delivers proven benefits for people and the environment – when it comes to making sustainability claims you can trust, nothing beats it.

1) GIVE CONTROL TO FARMERS, NOT GM COMPANIES
Organic farmers don’t have their choices controlled by GM companies.

2) ELIMINATE HAZARDOUS SYNTHETIC PESTICIDES
Organic cotton agriculture doesn’t use dangerous pesticides, protecting farmers’ lives and the environment.
3) HELP FARMERS FEED THEIR FAMILES.
Organic cotton enables farmers to grow other crops for food and income.

4) SAVE PRECIUS WATER
Organic cotton uses less water, preserving a scarce and precious resource for the future.

5) COMBAT CLIMATE CHANGE
Organic cotton farming uses less energy, and healthy organic soils store more CO2.

Soil_Association_Logo-p The Soil Association is a founder member of Global Standard GmbH, the managing body of the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS). Since 2002 we have worked with IVN (Germany), OTA (USA) and JOCA (Japan) to develop these unified global organic textile standards, which were first launched in 2006.
Produced under the Global Organic Textile Standard from 100% Indian organic cotton Certified by Soil Assocation No. DK19090

Carbon-label-smallThe Carbon Footprint of EarthPositive® products has been reduced by 90%
We have reduced the carbon footprint of EarthPositive® products by around 90% through a combination of innovative product design, low impact organic agriculture, efficiency in manufacturing, and by substituting standard grid electricity with renewable wind power. We do not use carbon offsets.
The carbon footprint (CO2e) is the total carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases emmitted during the cultivation and harvesting of cotton, fibre processing, textile production, packaging, transportation and warehousing.

Verification and Labelling
Carbon Trust Certification Limited provides independent verification of the carbon footprint of products and services. The independent verification by Carbon Trust Certification ensures the carbon footprint measurement is robust and credible, and enables Continental Clothing to communicate the Company’s credentials with integrity.
The Carbon Reduction Label is a way of communicating the impact of each garment on the climate, and displaying a very clear commitment to carbon reduction.
Saving Together
Until other apparel brands publish the exact GHG emission values of their products – using the same BSI standard methodology –
we can reasonably assume that the carbon footprint of a typical Men’s sweatshirt is in the range of 40-90kg of CO2e or even more. There are many variables that affect the final value- from the cotton seed through to the finished garment.